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Images Falser RIHA Journal 0071

Fig. 1

An undated photograph of a French mission to the temples of Angkor in the second half of the 19th century (Source: Archives Musée Guimet, Paris)

Fig. 10

The famous face towers of the Angkorian temples, depicted in (a) Thomson 1875, (b) Fergusson 1876, and Delaporte 1880 (Source: (a) John Thomson, The straits of Malacca, Indo-china and China, London 1875, p.151; (b) James Fergusson, History of Indian and Eastern architecture. Vol. 3 of History of architecture in all countries, London 1876, p. 680; (c) Louis Delaporte, Voyage au Cambodge. L’architecture Khmer, Paris 1880, p. 101)

Fig. 11

(a) Interior view of the Royal Architectural Museum, Tufton Street; (b) Interior view of the Museum of Ornamental Art, Classical Galleries, at the South Kensington Museum, c. 1857 (Source: (a) © British Library Board; (b) © V&A Images, The Victoria and Albert Museum, London)

Fig. 12

(a) The Architectural courts of the South Kensington Museum in a section plan; (b) the former European court with the Trajan’s Column in 2012; (c) the former Oriental court with the installation of the Sanchi gate, c. 1874 (Source: (a) John Physick, The Victoria and Albert Museum: The history of its building, Oxford, London 1982, 158; (b) photograph provided by the author (2012); (c) © V&A Images, The Victoria and Albert Museum, London)

Fig. 13

(a) The sketch of the ground plan of the musée Indo-chinois, c. 1880; (b) Delaporte’s sketches of the two floor plans of the musée Indo-chinois in 1886 (Source: Archive des Musées Nationaux AMN 5HH2-2)

Fig. 14

Two versions of architectural display in Delaporte’s musée Indo-chinois before 1900 (Source: (a) Armand Guérinet, ed., Le musée Indo-chinois, Paris n.d., plate 49; (b) © École National Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, ENSBA Paris)

Fig. 15

(a) A display of the facade of the western entry gate of Angkor Wat in the musée Indo-chinois, c.1900; (b) a replica of the Fontaine de la grosse horloge in 18th-century Rouen in the musée de Sculpture comparée, 1898 (Source: (a) Armand Guérinet, ed., Le musée Indo-chinois, Paris n.d., plate 4; (b) Frantz Marcou, Album du musée de Sculpture comparée, Série V (XVIIIe siècle), Paris 1898, pl. 34)

Fig. 16

(a) A coloured sketch by Delaporte to indicate the surfaces to be copied by mouldings, c. 1887; (b) the plaster cast replica of the outer western entry gate of Angkor Wat in the musée Indo-chinois, c.1900 (Source: (a) Delaporte Archives Loches/Philippe 2011; (b) Armand Guérinet, ed., Le musée Indo-chinois, Paris n.d., plate 3)

Fig. 17

A water colour by Lucien Fournereau of 1888/1889 entitled “Ruines Khmères du Cambodge” (Source: © École National Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, ENSBA Paris; photograph by Jean-Michel Lapelerie)

Fig. 18

(a) A 1:1-scale replica of the lower eastern section of the central tour of Angkor Wat in the musée Indo-chinois, c.1900; (b) A 1:1-scale replica of the 12th-century entry gate of the Saint-Pierre church in Moissac in the musée de Sculpture comparée, 1898 (Source: (a) Armand Guérinet, ed., Le musée Indo-chinois, Paris n.d., plate 2; (b) Frantz Marcou, Album du musée de Sculpture comparée, Série 1 (XIIe siècle), Paris 1898, pl. 17)

Fig. 19

The display of the bas-reliefs of Angkor Wat in a photograph of the Völkerkundemuseum Berlin (Stresemannstraße), around 1926 (Source: © National Museums Berlin, Prussian Cultural Foundation, Asian Art Museum, Art Collection South-, Southeast- and Central Asian Art)

Fig. 2

(a) An exotic depiction of the temple of Angkor Wat in Garnier’s 1873 publication Voyage d’exploration en Indo-Chine; (b) The first photograph of Angkor Wat ever taken, by John Thomson 1866 (Source: (a) Francis Garnier, Voyage d’exploration en Indo-Chine effectué pendant les années 1866, 1867 et 1868 par une commission française, Paris 1873, part II, plate 3; (b) © Library of University of St. Andrews, UK)

Fig. 20

(a) An elevation of the lower eastern section of the central tour of Angkor Wat and (b) a collage of original sculptures, plaster casts and photographs from the real site of Angkor Wat, both plataes in Delaporte’s 1924 publication Monuments du Cambodge (Source: Louis Delaporte, Monuments du Cambodge, Paris 1914-24, plates 36, 37, © Bibliothèque nationale de France)

Fig. 21

A sketchy floor plan of the musée Indo-chinois by the curator of the nearby musée Guimet, Philippe Stern in c.1925 with the indication of the free-standing temple reconstitutions of Bayon and Angkor Wat (Source: Philippe Stern, Inventaire des moulage du musée Indo-chinois (untitled, undated manuscript, c.1925, Archive du musée Guimet, Paris)

Fig. 22

Totally unknown until today, a floor plan of the architects Carlu, Azème and Boileau of May 1936 indicates that a "Musée Indo-chinois" was indeed foreseen until mid-1936 within the central space of the head pavilion of the Paris-wing within the new Trocadero Palace, and accompanied with other Southeast Asian sections on Javanese, Vietnamese ("art Tchiam"), Burmese and Indonesian ("art Insulinde") art, just as Delaporte had shown it in very small scale in his own museum before, compare Fig. 21). Most probably the nationalist director of the new musée de Sculpture comparée, Paul Deschamps, had voted to eliminate a transcultural parcours with sections of non-European collections in favour of an exhibition of purely French-national cultural heritage during the International Exhibition of 1937. (Source: Musée des Monuments Français, Paris. Thanks go to Emmanuelle Polack for her help)

Fig. 23

New copies of original plaster casts made from mouldings of the bas-reliefs of Angkor Wat as executed around 1900 for the Völkerkundemuseum in Berlin, photographed by the author in the archives for the Dahlem museums in Berlin, 2013 (Source: photograph provided by the author, 2013)

Fig. 3

(a) A depiction in Delaporte’s 1880 publication Voyage au Cambodge on the transport of original sculptures from Angkor to France; (b) The original Naga balustrade from Angkor during the 1878 Universal Exhibition in Paris (Source: Louis Delaporte, Voyage au Cambodge. L’architecture Khmer, Paris 1880, p. 239, 245)

Fig. 4

The 1:10 scale plaster model of an entry gate of Angkor Thom as presented during the 1878 Universal Exhibition, here re-exhibited in the musée Guimet after 1900 (Source: © Bridgeman Girandon/INHA Paris)

Fig. 5

(a) Cover page on Guérinet’s undated publication on the musée Indo-chinois in the Trocadero Palace; (b) The hybrid reconstitution of a Bayon-styled pavilion inside Delaporte’s musée Indo-chinois (Source: Armand Guérinet, ed., Le musée Indo-chinois. Antiquités cambodgiennes exposée du palais du Trocadéro. Paris n.d., cover, plate 37)

Fig. 6

Installations inside the Musée des monuments français of Alexandre Lenoir after 1800, (a) the introductory hall; (b) the free-standing facade of the Gaillon castle, (c) the tomb of Heloise and Abailard (Source: Louis Courajod, Alexandre Lenoir. Son journal et le musée des monuments français, vol. 3, Paris 1886, pp. 31, 23, 25)